6 Staging Pitfalls Sellers Should Avoid

nice-staging

Here are a few of the biggest pitfalls we’ve seen when sellers over-stage a home.

1. Don’t be dull

Are you selling a hotel room? No? Then a home shouldn’t look like a hotel! The purpose of staging is not to make the home boring and bland. The goal of staging is to get the potential buyer to feel that the home looks nice all the time, so it should feel like real—but incredibly neat!—people live there. As agents, we typically prefer boring over cluttered and crazy, but remember, a few spots of color photograph well and will stand out in listing photos. Simple touches add subtle interest, like a red throw pillow or a turquoise fruit bowl—just don’t go too wild.

2. Selling with smell

Ir can be tough to keep a listing in tip-top shape for spur of the moment showings. Of course, no one wants a home to smell like last night’s beef stroganoff when a potential buyer arrives. But many sellers overcompensate with potpourri and air fresheners. Beware of overwhelming a serious buyer with seriously strong scents. A home should smell fresh and clean, but not heavily perfumed. Your best bet is to invest in a deep clean to remove lingering smells and avoid cooking anything too potent during the list time.

3. The sound of music

Ditch the tunes. Mood music backfires more often than not. You won’t be able to guess the buyer’s musical tastes, and it can make some buyers feel like they’re being manipulated.

4. The elephant graveyard

Sometimes it’s necessary for the homeowners to move out before the house sells. But too many sellers take their best furniture and possessions with them to their new home, leaving only the most run-down furniture behind. In a sparsely furnished house, it’s even more important that the pieces left behind are tasteful and add to the ambiance of the home. The old sectional sofa sitting forlornly in an empty living room will just make the house feel abandoned. The house should be well furnished or completely empty. Not somewhere in between.

5. Wasting money on the wrong renovations

Many sellers undertake huge projects right before they sell. Perhaps the bathroom is outdated, and they’ve always wanted to fix it up. But it’s hard for sellers to guess which renovations will provide the greatest return on the investment. Small touches like new cabinet hardware or new light fixtures might go a long way toward making the home feel up to date, without doing a major renovation costing tens of thousands of dollars.

6. Remove clutter, don’t just move it around

We say this to virtually every client: When it comes to selling a home, less is more. An uncluttered home makes listing photos more attractive, which translates to more showings, and it makes the house feel open and airy. But it rarely works to try to hide the clutter. A serious buyer will want to look under the hood, kick the tires a little. That means they’ll explore the basement, open up your closets, and even look under your sink. So it’s important to get rid of extra belongings. It might seem like a lot of work, but it will make it easier to move out once you get the offer you’ve been waiting for.

Trulia 
Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

10 THINGS YOU SHOULD BE DOING TO YOUR HOME IN SPRING

We’re all aware of the idea of Spring cleaning (whether or not we do it – we mean REALLY do it – is another story). If you’re ready to delve in, we’ve got some tips for Spring cleaning, plus a few other Spring things you should be doing to your home. Ready to Spring forward?

1. Sell something

When the weather gets warmer, it’s time for a garage sale. Gather up all your unwanted stuff and put it out on the lawn. Might as well make some money for that old, ugly chair you’re embarrassed to put in your living room.

2. Donate something

Take everything that doesn’t sell over to a local charity. Not only will you be doing a good deed for people in need, but your donation is also tax deductible.

3. Trash something

If you have large items that cannot be sold or donated, you don’t have to live with them taking up all the space in your garage. Haul ‘em out. Many cities will schedule a large trash pickup one time a year, while others have sites where you can drop off for free. Check with your local city for options.

4. Clean something

The concept of spring cleaning isn’t about your normal program of vacuuming and dusting. It’s time to go deep. Move furniture and clean underneath and behind. Those are some world-class dust bunnies. Pull back the blinds and clean the windows. And while you’re at it, clean the blinds. They’re gross.

5. Scrub something

It’s a good time to get to those things that need a little extra effort. That weird spot in the shower you’ve been watching grow? Zap it for good. Clean out your washing machine. Yes, they actually make washing machine cleaner. Irony is good, and so is a sparkling clean washing machine.

6. Organize something

The closets you’ve been ignoring? It’s time. Really. Plan your attack and go for it. You never know what you’ll find in there that you’ve been missing (or forgot about). And cleaning out your closets are also a great way to find items to sell and donate (see #1 and #2).

organized closet
Photo / The Container Store7. Renew something

That ugly chair that didn’t sell at your garage sale? Maybe you could pretty it up with some paint or fabric? With a little time and effort, you might actually create a new favorite piece.

8. Plant something

Spring is the time to get your garden in gear. Flowers, bulbs, and certain veggies thrive in Spring. Urban Farmer has a great seed calendar, and see Huffington Post for vegetable planting ideas.

9. Update something

Paint colors stuck in a decade-old funk? It’s time for a fresh coat. Check out Benjamin Moore for the latest trends in paint colors.

10. Upgrade something

Maybe it’s just time to chuck it all and move. The Spring buying season is upon us, after all. If you are thinking of moving, remember that all the same rules apply for getting your home sale-ready as they do for getting Spring ready. So, basically, you’re not going to be able to get around that whole shower scrubbing thing!

 

 

 

Written by Jaymi Naciri on Saturday, 08 March 2014 7:12 pm
Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

10 Things Home Buyers Hate About Your Home!

You’re in the market for a new home, whether you need more space or less, you must first sell your present residence. One might think that the slow housing marking would potentially have buyers pounding at your door, but this is not necessarily the case. Prices are steady at the moment and seem not to be plummeting any further. This is good for a buyer and can be good for you, however, home buyers are smarter and leerier these days. They are less apt to make hasty decisions and less apt to buy out of their range, which is partially what contributed to the great housing market collapse. Houses are selling these days, but how quickly they sell is really up to you, the seller, and your agent. The houses that move are those that are priced well. Today’s buyer is savvy and has done his research. Buyers also want a turn-key home that is immediately ready for them to move in and unpack. What they don’t want are…

pinterest keep kitchens clean when selling your home 10 Things Home Buyers Hate About Your Home!

1. Bad Smells

Nothing is more of a turn-off than walking into a house that has a smell. Before you sell your home walk through with a friend, a Realtor, or someone you can rely on to give you an unbiased opinion. You will want to get rid of the source of any bad odor as soon as possible. Pets are big culprits, especially cats. If you have a cat, kitty litters need to be cleaned as often as possible and kept, if possible, in a remote or out of sight location. Wall to wall carpeting can harbor bad smells as well, especially if pets are present in the home. Clean all carpets professionally prior to listing your home. If you have a fan above your stove get in the habit of using it regularly to keep from cooking foods with particularly strong odors, such as fish, the evening before an open house or a showing. If your basement smells dank and musty consider purchasing a dehumidifier to clear the air of moisture and odors. If you can pop some chocolate chip cookies in the oven, or maybe an apple pie now that it’s fall. While some smells are offensive to home buyers, some are very inviting!

clean kitchens a must to sell your home yelp 10 Things Home Buyers Hate About Your Home!

2. Dirty house, especially bathrooms and kitchens

Having a house on the market is tough and hard work, especially when you have young children at home. If you don’t have time to clean your house daily, and really, nobody does, concentrate on your kitchen and bathrooms. Make sure floors are vacuumed and devoid of spills, crumbs and dirt. Make sure counters are wiped clean and that there are no dirty dishes in the sink. Don’t hide them in the oven for a quick remedy, house buyers are nosy and will look in your oven and any drawer or cabinet that can be opened! Keep a set of clean, dry towels on hand for the kitchen and bathroom for showing purposes.
pinterest living room tidy to sell home 10 Things Home Buyers Hate About Your Home!

3. Messy house

This is really an extension of the last point.  The average home buyer has a hard time looking past your clutter and mess. Simple, easy tasks, can make all the difference. If you have children you know that clutter happens. I am a huge fan of wicker baskets. They are inexpensive, efficient and look nice in your home. Invest in a few wicker baskets  as a quick way to stash toys when you don’t have time for an overhaul. Laundry is perhaps the hardest thing to keep on top of and is the most time consuming. If you don’t have time to wash, fold and put away your laundry on a daily basis, pick up a couple more wicker baskets to stow away clean, folded laundry so it doesn’t look like an eyesore. In the kitchen and in the bathroom clear away bottles and containers. Bowls of fresh fruit and vases or pitchers of fresh flowers not only look pretty but often make a room smell lovely.

selling your home neutral colors 10 Things Home Buyers Hate About Your Home!

4. Poorly lit rooms

No one wants to enter a dark house, especially someone who wants to buy your home. If a house is too poorly lit they may tend to wonder what you are trying to hide. Replace dim or burnt out light bulbs with high efficiency, bright bulbs to brighten up your space. If need be, pick up a few stylish lamps that will not only brighten your home but can add to your home decor. If you have big windows, take advantage of them. Make sure they are clean and make sure that drapes and curtains are not blocking the natural sunlight.  When it comes to selling your room, lighting really can be everything.
no wall paper when trying to sell home 10 Things Home Buyers Hate About Your Home!

5. Loud Walls and Busy Wallpaper

Shhhhhh!! Most likely the person who ends up buying your home will not have the same taste and style you do. They say one decorates their home for living, and one should re-decorate their home for selling. When you sell your home, you must remove yourself and your history from the overall picture. A home buyer wants to be able to envision him or herself in your home, not wonder about you, your lifestyle and your family. You don’t want to distract from the task at hand which is to sell your home. Tone down those bright and cheery colors and save them for your next home. Instead, use softer, more neutral tones like creams and off-whites that can make spaces like lighter, airier and brighter. If your home is covered in brightly patterned wallpaper you ought to give serious consideration to removing that as well. Potential buyers may be deterred by the paper knowing what a colossal  a nuisance it is to remove it.

well maintained outside of home pinterest 10 Things Home Buyers Hate About Your Home!

 

6. Unkempt yards, untrimmed bushes

Nothing is more unwelcoming than pulling up to a potentially Haunted House! Make sure your yard is well mowed, all bushes and hedges are trimmed. If you can add or fix up your landscaping with fresh or potted plants. The outside of your home is the first thing that will be seen. Let it be a great reflection of you and a great indication of what’s yet to be seen on the inside.

wall to wall carpeting 10 Things Home Buyers Hate About Your Home!

7. Wall to wall carpeting

If you can, please remove them. These days home buyers are looking for hardwood floors throughout. Even if they aren’t in the best of shape, hardwood floors are much more appealing than wall to wall carpeting. If you can’t rip out the wall to wall, please have it professionally steam cleaned.

entryways selling home 10 Things Home Buyers Hate About Your Home!

8. Neglected entryways

This is the first room everyone sees as soon as they pass through the front door. This is your greeting card. Let it be warm, friendly and welcoming. A simple bouquet of flowers, it need not necessarily be elaborate, makes a lovely statement. Clear out closets, and make sure that stray shoes and other items are neatly put away.

pet house 10 Things Home Buyers Hate About Your Home!

9. Your pets

May people are allergic. Many children are scared. Please keep your pets away from your home whenever possible.

via tumblr garage when showing your home leave 10 Things Home Buyers Hate About Your Home!

10. You!

I’m sure you are lovely and you know your home like no one else, but a potential home buyer simply does not want you there, or anywhere nearby. If you remain at home they won’t stay, they won’t linger and they won’t take their time to look around to get a proper look and feel. You will not be doing yourself any favors by remaining at home. Leave the selling to your Realtor, that’s why, after all, you’ve hired him (or her!)

 

Freshomes.com
Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

5 REASONS TO SELL NOW

 

Many sellers are still hesitant about putting their house up for sale. Where are prices headed? Where are interest rates headed? Can buyers qualify for a mortgage?  These are all valid questions. However, there are several reasons to sell your home sooner rather than later. Here are five of those reasons.

1. The Most Serious Buyers Are Out Now

Most people realize that the housing market is hottest from April through June. The most serious buyers are well aware of this and, for that reason, come out in early spring in order to beat the heavy competition. These buyers are readywilling and able to buy…and are in the market right now!

2. There Is Less Competition Now

Housing supply always grows from the spring through the early summer. The choices buyers have will continue to increase over the next few months. Don’t wait until all the other potential sellers in your market put their homes up for sale.

3. The Process Will Be Quicker

One of the biggest challenges of the 2014 housing market has been the length of time it takes from contract to closing. Banks are requiring more and more paperwork before approving a mortgage. As the market heats up, banks will be inundated with loan inquiries causing closing timelines to lengthen.  Selling now will make the process quicker and simpler.

4. There Will Never Be a Better Time to Move-Up

If you are moving up to a larger, more expensive home, consider doing it now. Prices are projected to appreciate by over 19% from now to 2018. If you are moving to a higher priced home, it will wind-up costing you more in raw dollars (both in down payment and mortgage payment) if you wait. You can also lock-in your 30 year housing expense with an interest rate at about 4.5% right now. Rates are projected to be well over 5% by this time next year.

5. It’s Time to Move On with Your Life

Look at the reason you decided to sell in the first place and decide whether it is worth waiting. Is money more important than being with family? Is money more important than your health? Is money more important than having the freedom to go on with your life the way you think you should?

You already know the answers to the questions we just asked. You have the power to take back control of the situation by pricing your home to guarantee it sells. The time has come for you and your family to move on and start living the life you desire.

That is what is truly important.

KCM Crew 3-18-2014
Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Buying a Home Less Expensive than Renting – by 38%!

House in Hands

Trulia released their Rent vs. Buy Report last week. The report explained that homeownership remains cheaper than renting in all of the 100 largest metro areas by an average of 38%!

The other interesting findings in the report include:

  • Even though prices increased sharply in many markets over the past year, low mortgage rates have kept homeownership from becoming more expensive than renting.
  • Some markets might tip in favor of renting this year as prices continue to rise faster than rents and if – as most economists expect – mortgage rates rise, due both to the strengthening economy and Fed tapering.
  • Nationally, rates would have to rise to 10.6% for renting to be cheaper than buying – and rates haven’t been that high since 1989.

Buying a home now makes sense. You can lock in a mortgage payment before home prices and mortgage rates rise as experts expect they will. If you rent, your housing expense will only continue to increase.

 

 on March 12, 2014
Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

How to Price Real Estate

1963 Chevrolet Corvette

Location may have the most effect on value but Price is without question the most important factor controlling the sale of real estate.  Anything will sell anytime, how long will it take depends on the price.

Think about it this way – you may really want to buy a car for your collection and your favorite happens to be a 1963 Corvette.  So you hear about one for sale, in mint condition, across town but the only problem is the price, the owner is asking $150,000!  Well, although you really, really want a mint condition 1963 Corvette, there is no way you will pay anywhere close to $150,000, in fact you know that the most a 1963 Corvette has ever sold for is about $200,000 and that was for a very rare model, which this one is not.

Because you are a bit obsessed with owning one of these cars you spend almost all of your free time, and some of the time you should be working, searching the internet for available cars.  Through this exhaustive search you have become somewhat of an expert on the values of 1963 Corvettes, especially in your town.  You happen to know that the particular model for sale across town is worth about $95,000…maybe $100,000.  In fact, if the asking price was $100,000 or even $110,000 you would’ve driven over there today with your checkbook and driven home in a 1963 Corvette!

So why don’t you go make an offer?  Well, let’s face it when you see a price that is so high compared to the actual value it makes you think that the seller is either difficult to deal with and is out of touch with reality or that he must not really want to sell the car, instead he is just fishing for the one fool in the world that will pay $150,000 for a car that is worth $95,000.  So you don’t even go look at it or call for more information…you just keep searching the various websites to find the car of your dreams.

Yes, you guessed it the Corvette in this example actually represents your home or other real estate you might be trying to sell.  (in fact it represents any item that can be bought and sold).

Wiggle room = Bad idea

Most sellers think that it is necessary to “leave a little wiggle room” in the price.  They think this because they think that all buyers will make aggressively low offers…no matter what the asking price.  WRONG!!

Buyers pay the fair market value …in other words they will pay you what it is worth!  Your job is to find out what it is worth and price it at or near that value.

This is where brokers and/or appraisers come into the picture.  The right way to price your property is to have a professional REALTOR/broker or appraiser prepare a CMA (Comparative Market Analysis) on your property.  A CMA involves finding recent sales of similar properties, adjusting for any differences, to arrive at a current market value of your property.  Once you have this value you should have your broker set the asking price no more than 3% to 5% higher than that current market value.

If you do this, your property will sell quickly for a price equal to exactly what it is worth, or higher!   Buyers as a general rule DO NOT make “low-ball” offers, there are some rare occasions when that happens but the vast majority of initial offers are 5% or less below asking price.

If sellers price their property correctly the buyers will know it immediately because, just like in the Corvette example, buyers spend every spare moment searching the internet for a home, they have made themselves experts on the market value of the particular type of home in the particular area they desire.  For this reason the buyer also knows when a property is overpriced.  Most buyers will not even go look at a property that is overpriced, they say to themselves “why bother?” they assume that the seller is unreasonable and/or is not truly interested in selling the property.

Yesterday, the Buyer’s Specialist that works for my team and I were showing a house to some buyers who were very motivated had already decided on the neighborhood.  The house was well within their price range and met every one of their criteria.  As we stood in the kitchen discussing what price we should offer we found ourselves drawn to the fact that the house had been on and off of the market for the last four years!

The conversation immediately turned to “what is wrong with this house?”   It turns out that the house hasn’t sold because it was severely overpriced most of that 4 years, it happens to be well priced now but the stigma it carries because of the lengthy time on the market will likely result in it selling for less than it is really worth.

Moral of this whole story is – buyers will pay what it is worth – Seller’s job is to find out what it is worth and set the asking price 3%-5% higher than that number…then sit and wait for the offers to roll in.

 

Ashley Garner – KCM
Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Taking Root: New Garden Trends in 2014

While winter still casts its chill, blankets snow, and layers ice in many parts of the country, landscape experts are busy studying garden catalogs, nursery websites, and interior design trends that can work outdoors.

Improving a home’s landscaping offers a win-win-win: greater enjoyment, increased home values, and enhanced curb appeal that may help attract buyers.

To gain the biggest bang for their dollars, home owners should understand their site’s topography, orientation, climate, and economy, as well as their own budget. What’s popular in one city experiencing growth may not appeal where the economy is stagnant, says landscape architect Stephen Wlodarczyk of Botanical Decorators in Olney, Md.

Here are popular trends reported from around the country and tips you can pass on to your clients:

Low maintenance. Busy home owners want to enjoy yards that don’t require a lot of time and effort to maintain. This trend is translating into more low-maintenance, carefree choices for outdoor spaces, such materials for decks, patios, and columns that don’t require repainting or replacing, furnishings that can be left outdoors throughout the year and won’t fade, and plant materials that don’t have to be constantly watered, fertilized, or pruned.

This, in turn, is leading to greater use of perennials instead of annuals in gardens, since annuals require yearly replacement. To compensate for the color advantage of annuals, landscape specialists suggest that color come from accessories such as pillows, placemats, and dishes.

Wildflowers, too, are less labor-intensive than cottage and cutting garden choices, and also less pricey.

Simpler in design and care, yet still pleasing, are gardens that incorporate five to seven varieties of flowers rather than dozens, says Daniel Richards, general manager of design at Hicks Nurseries in Westbury, N.Y. “You can go with one big bank of roses in one color rather than 20 different kinds in multiple colors,” he says.

Container gardens also pare down maintenance, and pots can winter indoors. But the downside is that they need to be watered more frequently since water in smaller containers will evaporate faster than it will in the ground.

Although water features remain popular, these, too, are beginning to reflect the desire for less intense care. More home owners install pools with salt water to decrease the need for chlorination, and some go with natural pools where rocks and plantings cleanse water. Still others opt for small fountains for the soothing sight and sound of trickling water. And if they want a more lavish water wall or cascade, they ask for water to be recirculated for conservation, says Chris Cipriano, owner ofCipriano Landscape Design in Mahway, N.J. The size of pipes can also reduce evaporation, with oversized designs slowing the velocity and loss, he adds.

When it comes to grass, “Grassology’s” grass-like product requires less water and feeding since its roots go deeper than ordinary grass to find water and nutrients instead of depending on traditional methods. The “grass” also doesn’t grow as high, so less mowing is needed.

Entertaining outdoors. Today’s home owners want an outdoor entertainment space, so more are adding patios, decks, or terraces large enough to accommodate comfortable seating; often the finished result resembles an indoor room.

The furnishings selected for outdoor entertainment areas are also sturdier — sometimes indistinguishable in quality and look from what home owners use indoors — and upholstery is more fade-resistant.

Bells and whistles make outdoor living even more pleasurable, whether it’s surround sound, weatherproof TVs, or well-equipped kitchens. While some home owners still find a good grill sufficient, especially if their indoor kitchen is close by, others are ramping up their cooking zones with appliances specifically designed for outdoor use — sinks, refrigerators, beer taps, pizza ovens, and rotisseries. Storage and countertops are also more frost-proof.

To shade those who lounge or dine, pergolas continue to flourish, matched stylistically to a home’s design or favorite vacation paradise — perhaps Tuscany or the South Seas. To shade better, many are planted with flowering vines.

For those who aren’t as focused on saving dollars, water features are ever more lavish and resort-like. Vanishing-edge pools, where water seems to spill over indefinitely, are increasing popular, says Cipriano. “Home owners want to feel they’re going to their own five-star hotel,” he says.

Sustainably savvy. Native vegetation choices have caught on in landscaping because they don’t require frequent watering or as much feeding, fertilizing, and pruning, and these plants know how to survive in their region. They also offer the plus of attracting more native wild life, bees, butterflies, and bugs.

Green gardening also means less lawn for many, and more hardscape that’s permeable such as gravel or brick, so water can seep through and be reused. All hardscape isn’t the goal either, since some greenness is key to a home looking residential and inviting, says Sacramento, Calif., landscape designer Michael Glassman, whose state has experienced a terrible drought.

If  a home owner insist on lawn and plants, they should consider going with a choices that can be left more natural to resemble a meadow or prairie, or they might consider synthetic turf, which now looks much more realistic.

Many home owners are also planting vegetable and herb beds to grow more of their own food, which inspired Elizabeth Robinson Edwards and her husband Williams recently to launch their Edwards Yards business to help home owners learn how to amend poor soil and grow food sustainably.

Drip irrigation systems help conserve water better than sprays, which often throw into the air haphazardly, says Jim Drzewiecki of Ginkgo Leaf Studio in Cedarburg, Wisc. For home owners eager to lower water use, they should consider installing rain barrels and other collection methods.

More home owners also want to incorporate local, recycled, and renewable materials, such as stone quarried nearby and reclaimed lumber, says landscape designer Laurie Van Zandt, whose firm, The Ardent Gardener is based in Huntsville, Utah.

Extended use. Better lighting and warmth are key for extending backyard enjoyment into the night and for a greater part of the year (even in colder climates).

For illumination, LEDs are replacing halogen bulbs because of their greater energy efficiency, particularly as their prices come down. These lights are being used not just for eating and sitting, but also to accent specimen trees, garden furnishings, and artwork. Richards says make sure the lighting effect is visible while concealing the source of the light.

Adding a fire pit or fireplace also encourages home owners to use their outdoors as the weather becomes nippier. Fire pits are a more affordable option, but if home owners are planning to stay in their home for a long time, a permanent outdoor fireplace can bring many years of beauty and enjoyment.

Before home owners install either, they should know their community’s regulations regarding having a fire outdoors and how far the structure must be from the house.

A fire bowl offers a less intense flame, but still provides the effect, and several can be placed around the perimeter of a terrace or by a pool, says Glassman.

For those homeowners who prefer going barefoot, he also suggests radiant heat installed under wood boards, in the same manner as indoors kitchens and bathrooms.

All the senses. Attracting bees, birds, and other animals can add pleasant outdoor sounds. And an array of smells from plants, flowers, and herbs also can enhance home owners’ pleasure, says Van Zandt, but try not to have too many that may overpower one another.

Bolder colors outdoors rank high on wish lists, as they do inside, from periwinkle blue to zesty orange, but know that classic white and blue rarely loses its cachet. The Perennial Plant Association namedPanicum virgatum, “Northwind,” the 2014 plant of the year with its vertical ornamental grass with blue green foliage forming a clump 4 to 5 feet high and 2 to 3 feet wide, Wlodarczyk says.

More personalized curb appeal. A front yard can become more appealing through a host of features beyond a lawn and decorative walk, says Van Zandt.

Use textured plantings, different height materials, some variation in color throughout the year, a piece of garden art or interesting furniture such as an antique bench, maybe a small water feature, and even a painted wall that coordinates with their home’s façade and architectural elements.

And whatever choices home owners consider, they should keep costs to no more than 5 to 10 percent of their home’s value, so they don’t over-improve.

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment
Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.